Auditory Training – What It Is and How It Facilitates Habits for More Effective Listening with Hearing Loss

Speaker Series Event:  Auditory Training – What It Is and How It Facilitates Habits for More Effective Listening with Hearing Loss with Geoff Plant

photo of Geoff Plant, seated, posing next to bronze statueGeoff Plant, President  of the non-profit Hearing Rehabilitation Foundation (HRF), is a long time provider of auditory training to children and adults with hearing loss, including those fitted with hearing aids, cochlear implants, and tactile aids.

 

From the Hearing Rehabilitation Foundation website:

“The past twenty years have seen many exciting technological innovations for people with acquired profound hearing losses. These have included greatly improved hearing aid designs, specialized assistive listening devices, the introduction and rapid development of cochlear implants, and innovations in tactile aid design. Despite these developments, it is apparent that technology is not always enough, and that some people with acquired deafness require special additional assistance even after the fitting of the most appropriate devices.”

In addition to his client practice, Geoff presents speech communication training workshops for teachers and clinicians working with adults and children and organizes the biennial Adult Aural Rehabilitation Conference for hearing healthcare professionals.

Build Your Resiliency to Stress: An Introduction to The Relaxation Response

photo of Laura MalloyWorkshop Event: Build Your Resiliency to Stress: An Introduction to The Relaxation Response  with Laura Malloy, LICSW

This program allowed participants to engage in a dialogue about stressors that are unique to living with hearing loss and learn about the Relaxation Response, the antidote to the stress response.  Participants also discussed and practiced simple, evidence-based strategies to help build resiliency and stress hardiness.

Laura Malloy, LICSW is the Co-Director of the Education Initiative and Director of Yoga at the Benson-Henry Institute at Mass General Hospital.  She teaches various forms of relaxation and stress reduction in educational, clinical and community settings.

Advocating for Yourself in the Workplace–How to Make Your Organization More Accessible for People with Hearing Loss

Barbara Johnson featured on cover of "Seen and Heard"
Barbara Johnson was featured in the “Seen and Heard” section of the July/August issue of Hearing Loss Magazine.

Speaker Series Event: Advocating for Yourself in the Workplace – How to Make Your Organization More Accessible for People with Hearing Loss with Barbara Johnson

Barbara Johnson is an active member of both ALDA Boston and HLAA Boston chapter.  Employed as the Project Manager in charge of Customer Support, Information Services & Technology at Massachusetts Institute of Technology, her presentation on workplace self-advocacy was highly acclaimed at the 2013 HLAA Convention in Portland.

Barbara’s presentation helped participants understand the broad benefits of accessibility in the workplce for those with hearing loss.  Hearing loss at work does not have to be an obstacle.  The benefits of greater accessibility are both global and local, assisting individuals with and without hearing loss.

Captioning in the Twenty-First Century: Digital TV, Online, and Mobile

Speaker Series Event:   Captioning in the 21st Century: Digital TV, Online, and Mobile
with Larry Goldberg

Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary

photo of Larry Goldberg
Larry Goldberg, innovator and advocate

Larry Goldberg is founder and director of the Carl and Ruth Shapiro Family National Center for Accessible Media (NCAM) at Boston’s public media leader, WGBH. Mr. Goldberg reviewed the current laws and regulations governing TV and online media; how and where to access captioned media; and how to advocate for captioning in public places.  Refreshments and socializing to follow the presentation.

NCAM is a research and development group which focuses on public policy, advancing access to media and technology for people with disabilities. Under Larry’s leadership, NCAM has conducted dozens of innovative R&D projects for full inclusion in such fields as online education and digital publishing, mobile devices and mobile media, in-flight entertainment, home media networks, Web-based media, theatrical motion pictures, museums and theme parks, and many others. Larry regularly briefs Congressional and regulatory agencies on barriers and opportunities in new and emerging media and was instrumental in the passage of landmark legislation for accessible media and technology.

Quiet Restaurant Project Debuts

The first Quiet Restaurants event was terrific!  Rabia’s in the North End is, indeed, a quiet restaurant before 7:30 PM or so, and then it becomes quite lively.  The food is amazingly good, and Boston chapter members and friends had a chance to meet and talk about ideas for new chapter social events, the Walk4Hearing, hearing loss forums – and the Red Sox.  Stay tuned for the next date at one of Boston’s “Quiet Restaurants,” and send us your suggestions for quiet restaurants.  (email HLAABoston@gmail.com, subject line “Quiet Restaurants.”)

Fabulous food and quiet with our “Quiet Restaurants” project!
Fabulous food and quiet with our “Quiet Restaurants” project!
On the Rose Kennedy Greenway walk from the Government Center T-stop to Rabias.
On the Rose Kennedy Greenway walk from the Government Center T-stop to Rabias.

When A Hearing Aid Is Not Enough

Mark RossThe renowned and beloved rehabilitation audiologist, Mark Ross, wrote, “When A Hearing Aid Is Not Enough” in 1999, but its message remains as relevant today as when it was first published.

In order to live well with hearing loss, people benefit from a comprehensive approach to hearing loss treatment that enables them to learn how to  actively manage communication.

(“Self Help for Hard of Hearing People”, referenced in the paper, is now Hearing Loss Association of America.)